How to Move with A Fence

Shir Ende’s fence holds nothing in and keeps nothing out. Though it mimics architectural elements of the fencing that surrounds and segments the park, Shir’s “fence” is mobile, invites play and collaboration, and is scaled in relation to the body instead of the landscape. Through carefully choreographed motions, Shir engages the fence as a companion rather than a barrier. No longer rigid and permanent, the fence is transformed into an intimate, personal form, activated by movement and touch. (Elizabeth Lalley)

 As a part of Terrain Biennial, a public art festival with locations throughout Chicago and the country, I held a durational performance in which I invited patrons of Buttercup Park to move with a fence that I constructed specifically for the park. During the hour-long performance, I taught participants the movement I created for the piece and together we moved the fence.

As a part of Terrain Biennial, a public art festival with locations throughout Chicago and the country, I held a durational performance in which I invited patrons of Buttercup Park to move with a fence that I constructed specifically for the park. During the hour-long performance, I taught participants the movement I created for the piece and together we moved the fence.

How to Move with A Fence
 As a part of Terrain Biennial, a public art festival with locations throughout Chicago and the country, I held a durational performance in which I invited patrons of Buttercup Park to move with a fence that I constructed specifically for the park. During the hour-long performance, I taught participants the movement I created for the piece and together we moved the fence.
How to Move with A Fence

Shir Ende’s fence holds nothing in and keeps nothing out. Though it mimics architectural elements of the fencing that surrounds and segments the park, Shir’s “fence” is mobile, invites play and collaboration, and is scaled in relation to the body instead of the landscape. Through carefully choreographed motions, Shir engages the fence as a companion rather than a barrier. No longer rigid and permanent, the fence is transformed into an intimate, personal form, activated by movement and touch. (Elizabeth Lalley)

As a part of Terrain Biennial, a public art festival with locations throughout Chicago and the country, I held a durational performance in which I invited patrons of Buttercup Park to move with a fence that I constructed specifically for the park. During the hour-long performance, I taught participants the movement I created for the piece and together we moved the fence.

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